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Transmission Fluid

Posted On: April 13, 2016

We recommend using Ford Type F or Dexron 3 in all our transmissions.  They can be purchased in any AutoZone or Advance Auto Parts.

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Converting the Ford 5R55S to the 4STB-E (AODE/4R70W)

Posted On: July 16, 2009

Introduction:

If you are reading this, chances are, you are considering swapping from the OEM Ford automatic to a FB Performance 4STB-E (4R70W/AODE) transmission on a 2005 (or newer) Mustang. Before you get all worked up, please understand that it does not take a neurosurgeon in order to accomplish the swap. You (or your mechanic) has to absolutely have the ability to perform normal drive-train work. More importantly, the ability to do neat and clean soldering is a must, (unless you plan on replacing a substantial portion of the wiring harness).  If you do, then all you will need is the parts list (that follows).

If you decide not to replace the wiring harness, you are asking for trouble if you do not have basic soldering skills. If you do, you'll be amazed at how smoothly the changeover will go. This write-up does not go into detail about how to perform the actual drive-train work  (See transmission Installation Instructions). It will, however, provide you with all of the details that are important for the swap.

There are (6) basic steps to accomplish this changeover:
1)  Acquire necessary parts
2)  Remove automatic transmission and related parts
3)  Install the 4STB-E transmission, torque converter and related parts
4)  Make several electrical connections
5)  Replace Powertrain Control Module (PCM)
6)  Have a Ford service tech set up your new PCM

Note:  When converting from the Ford 5-speed Stick transmission the only requirements involve the replacement of the drive-line components.  There is no concern regarding the PCM because the 4STB-E transmission has a full-manual valvebody and will utilize the same PCM that came with the Stick.

Things Worth Noting

A) You will reuse your existing cross-member with a supplied trans-mount bracket.

B) You have the option of replacing the driveshaft with a one-piece unit, but the driveshaft yoke must be changed.

C)  You can retain the existing 164 tooth flexplate, but the torque converter adapter plate will have to be removed. The replacement converter will bolt directly to the existing flexplate.  You also have the option of replacing the OEM flexplate with a heavy duty SFI rated version. 

D) You will only use the supplied engine to trans. mounting bolts. (but do hold onto the original bolts)

E) Cars with the OEM Manual trans. have a relay (aux. relay #1) that is located under the dash on the driver's side. Automatic cars do not have it. The relay keeps the PCM hot for 1 second after the engine is shut down. We were not able to find out why the relay is there at the time of this writing, but is has not been of any concern so far because to date it has not been used in any conversion. The cars run fine with no warning lights on the dash.  The only thing that was noticed when reading the trouble codes with a hand-tuner, was that it showed a code saying " low voltage to aux. relay".  This might explain the only side effect which is a very slight delay before the starter responds to the key switch command.

F) As of this writing, the (2) harness plugs under the car for the reverse lamp switch and the output shaft speed sensor were also not available from Ford yet. Our instructions will show you how to make reliable connections here.

G) You will be running a custom wiring circuit (fused) in order for the reverse lamps to work. This is because your automatic wiring harness lacks the 2 pins in the PCM plug that completes this circuit.

H) You can probably avoid most of the electrical issues by replacing a substantial portion of the vehicles wiring harness. Many people choose not to do that. In our opinion, the process as described is a neat, clean and acceptable solution. I will satisfy the most demanding car enthusiast.

I)  Read all of the instructions very carefully. Perform all work at your own risk. You an only you are responsible for decisions made and work performed.  When this is done as described, it will result in a successful conversion.  You also have the option of having a qualified shop do this conversion for you.

'05 & Up Mustang OEM Automatic to 4STB-E Transmission

                                Swap Parts List

(Qty)    (Part#)                            (Description)
(1)        SS16105-S-00               FB 4STB-E Transmission w/Various Options

                                              http://www.fbperformance.com/viewtrans.asp?TransmissionID=76
(1)        ----------------              9" or 10" Full Race Torque Converter w/Single disk L/U (Multi-disk optional)

(1)        F6ZZ*7007*EA           Spacer plate (between engine and trans.- Optional)

(1)        ----------------              Aftermarket SFI approved HD. Flexplate Optional

(1)        ----------------              Polyurethane trans mount (AODE/4R70W type)
(1)        2-3-14061                  1330 Heavy Duty Spicer Yoke (Lg. OD)

(1)        ----------------              Trans mount/cross-member Bracket 

(1)        ----------------              Single piece Steel or Alum. Driveshaft (Optional)

(1)        (Various)                    Aftermarket 3-speed shifter (w/FWD Shift pattern)

(1)        4R3Z*7277*ABD        Gaiter (leather shift boot for use with Aftermarket Shifter)

(1)        -MF (4STB-E opt)        FB Multi-function Auto-reset Relay Controller for Overdrive & Lock-Up
(1)        5R3Z*12A650*ACD     Reman. Manual trans. PCM (or have existing PCM re-programmed)
(1)        ---------------               12-foot length of Corregated plastic harness tubing (5/16" or 3/8")
(1)        ---------------                2-foot length of Heat shrink tubing for 16-18 ga. wire
(5)        ---------------                Top 5 trans. to engine mounting bolts have to be shorter than the ones
that came 

                                                with the automatic. The new bolts should be 2 1/2"long excluding bolt heads

(1)        --------------                 Tube of  5-minute epoxy (General purpose, Get it at the auto parts store)
(1)        --------------                 Roll of Electrical tape

(20)      --------------                 Medium size Wire ties (tie wraps)
(1)        --------------                 In-line fuse holder with ten amp fuse
(1)        --------------                 Roll of 18 ga. wire
(1)        3U2Z*14S411*VBA     Wire assy (pigtail)
(1)        3U2Z*14S411*SFA     Wire assy(pigtail)

Special Notes:

J)  It was recently brought to our attention that you do not have to buy a manual trans PCM (computer). You will however have to contact a highly qualified Ford technician or a tuning professional who can use Ford software to re-program your existing automatic PCM to eliminate all automatic functions. This will work on both the '05-'06 Mustangs.  However with the 07 it will not, and no one has figured that one out as of this writing...you'll need a Stick PCM.

K)  If you buy the 2 pigtails, the output shaft speed sensor and rev. light switch modification will not have to be performed. If you don't buy the pigtails you will see later in these instructions how to modify existing sensor and switch, but its recommended you buy the pigtails now that they are available.

Section A

R&R Drive Line Components

Lower the windows 1/4" because the battery will be disconnected. Remove h-pipe, and the following drive-train components: driveshaft, automatic transmission, converter and converter mounting plate.  The original flexplate can be retained, unless an aftermarket piece is desired.  The original shifter can also be reused if it is modified for the neutral lockout function.  An aftermarket shifter with a 3-speed forward shift pattern can also be used.  Some are equipped with a momentary push-button that is generally used for the optional trans-brake feature. The aftermarket shifter can be installed with the rubber boot, and leather gaiter boot.

Make a note as to the location of all (4) Oxygen sensors. You cannot mix their locations up. Each sensor must be installed in the same location on the exhaust system where they came from. Retain the original transmission fluid cooler and cooling lines, unless it is desirable to them with the #6 stainless steel braided type. Keep reverse light switch and output shaft speed sensor out of the transmission for now.

Install the 4STB-E transmission, and torque converter making sure that there is adequate converter-to-flexplate clearance (1/8 to 3/16 use drill bit as a feeler gauge). The OEM cross-member can be reused in its original location if the new cross-member bracket is used.  If not, the position of the cross-member will have to be adjusted to the correct trans mount location. Install transmission mount.  Confirm the distance from the back of the tail housing to the centerline of the rear pinion yoke to confirm the proper drive shaft length. Have the new yoke added to the existing driveshaft or to its replacement. The driveshaft, the h-pipe and anything else that was removed can now be reinstalled.

Section B

Install and Connect Wires for OD and Lock-up Auto Reset Controller

The Auto Reset Controller includes the following components:

(2) Momentary Push-button switches for Overdrive and Converter Lock-up

(1) Multi-Relay Pack with color coded wires

(1) Pressure Sensor switch (pre-installed on transmission)

Mount each of the Momentary switches in a convenient location either on the dashboard or the console.  Secure the Relay Pack in convenient location that is not exposed to any heat (such as under in the console).  This centralized location will reduce the amount wiring required. Use the following color-coded Wiring diagram to connect all of the various functions.

(Insert color-coded wiring schematic)

Section C

Oxygen Sensors and Output Speed Sensor Wiring Harness

You will now begin running the wiring harness to the proper locations and begin making circuit connections. You can refer to page 2 to see the differences between the auto and manual transmissions. When I did the swap, I used long tube headers and a new catted h-pipe which moved all four 02 sensors further back on the exhaust system. I had to extend the sensor harness sections in order to reach the 02 sensors. We chose to run the harness down the passenger side of the transmission with 2 harness extensions that went over the top of the transmission to the rev. lamp switch and the output shaft speed sensor. If you are using the stock exhaust, I suggest you run the harness down the driver's side of the trans like in the picture on page 2.

If for some reason you have a problem with wiring reaching one of the components, just extend that section of the harness using wire, solder, heat shrink tubing and the corrugated harness tubing. Just button up any extensions you make by making them look like the sections of harness that Ford has all over the car.   Start with the front 02 sensors and work your way back. In other words, lay out the harness to see if your way is going to allow all of the connections to be made without too much soldering and extending harness sections. Once you have decided on which way to run the harness, start from front to rear (front 02 sensors first) and work your way back to the rear most connections. Remember, each 02 sensor must be connected to it's original position, you can't mix right and left sides or front and rear. The only circuits that are in play here are the four 02 sensor harness sections and the output shaft speed sensor harness section. Do not tape up the plugs that won't be used anymore. You will have a slight modification to do on one of them later.

For the output shaft speed sensor, just run the section of harness that goes to the output shaft speed sensor for now. Later, you will run a new 2-wire section of harness from the rev. light switch at the transmission up to the engine compartment.      
Once you have the four 02 sensors connected and the one harness section that goes to the trans in it's general position, just leave the harness hang there without any wire ties to secure it to anything.

Section D

Wiring Reverse Lights - Speed Sensor Transmission Harness

The reverse light switch and output shaft speed sensor each have 2 wires that have to be soldered to them. If you look into their plug sockets, you will notice that the connector pins are too far inside of the sockets to actually solder wires to them. What you will have to do is cut the plug sockets down lower so the pins are much closer to the top opening of each socket. You want the connector pins to be just below the top of the socket opening. See page 5, pictures A and B. Don't laugh too hard my drawing. You can cut the sockets down with a dremel tool, hacksaw, cut-off tool or whatever you have that will make a decent cut. The rev. light switch will need two 18 ga. wires soldered to the connector pins inside of the switch. The wires should be 6 to 8 feet long because they will be run up to the engine compartment while being protected by some of the corrugated harness tubing. See page 5 picture B for solder connection view. After the wires are soldered to the pins in the switch, put the switch in a vice and fill the socket cavity with 5-minute epoxy or high temp. silicone. This will protect and seal the connections. Go under the car and pull the harness backdown off of the transmission. Take the section of harness that has the output shaft speed sensor plug on it and cut the plug off. it is the plug that is at the rearmost end of the harness. The two wires are dark blue with a yellow stripe and gray with a red stripe. Solder the wires to the pins inside of the cavityof the output shaft speed sensor. Then fill the cavity with epoxy or high temp. silicone.

Before you button up the transmission harness, look at the picture on page 2 of the automatic transmission. At the bottom of the picture you will see a harness plug labeled C167. Pin 10 and 12 of that connector have to be connected so your starter will work. See page 5 and look at the close up view of plug C167 so you can tell which wires are 10 and 12. The picture shows the opening of the plug. Cut the 2 wires from the back of the plug (not shown in picture). Solder the wires together and seal with heat shrink tubing. After that, install the harness back to it's final position with the rev. light switch and output shaft speed sensor installed on the transmission. Make sure you have the two long wires that come off of the rev. light switch protected with the corregated plastic harness tubing. All of the unused plugs that were for the automatic transmission should be completely sealed up with plenty of electrical tape and secured with wire ties. Secure the harness neatly to the transmission with wire ties and run the new reverse light switch harness up to the engine compartment and leave it near the fuse box for now.

Section E

Transmission Harness

Ok, so now you have 2 new harness sections that end up at the fuse box area. One comes from the transmission and the other comes from the strut tower. The one from the transmission has 2 wires in it. Solder one of the 2 wires directly to the single wire that comes from the strut tower harness. Seal the connection with heat shrink tubing. Now you have one wire left that is from the trans. harness. This wire has to be connected to a (+) power source. Before you do that, install an in-line fuse holder to the end of the wire, so that the new end has a fuse before the connection is made to (+).  Install a 10 amp fuse in the fuse holder. You must have a fuse.

If for some reason the wiring harness ever shorts to ground, this will prevent a potential fire. I connected the fused wire directly to the (+) cable at the fuse box. The only problem with this is when I park the car and shut off the engine, the rev. lights will stay on if I leave the car in reverse. I never park in reverse, so that's ok with me, I park in 1st gear. If you want, you can probe the fuse box for a location that is only hot when the key switch is on, but I chose not to do that because I didn't want to pull extra amps from any circuit that is already in use. My biggest fear was the car's pcm possibly detecting the increased amp load and causing a problem. I doubt it would cause a problem, but this super smart pcm is beyond my comprehension, so why take the chance. 

Section F

PCM Powertrain Control Module

Now, you can start the car. It will be in failsafe mode and will not run very well because the pcm thinks the transmission is overheated. There's probably a dozen or so signals that are no longer sending feedback to the pcm from the auto. transmission. This causes the pcm to protect the engine by limiting power. You will see a wrench light on the dash when you drive and the overdrive light will flash. The engine will run kind of "funky".

Take the car to a dealer with the new pcm still in the box. The dealer will have to have another mustang gt on the lot with a manual transmission in it. Call the dealer first and verify that and set up an appointment with them. Some dealers may tell you that they won't mess with it. Here's the instructions:

 

Bring both of your car keys with you. Have tech. pull the program out of another mustang gt with manual transmission in it. He will use his WDS Ford computer to do this. Make sure you reset your old pcm to stock program if you have a custom tune in it. You must have the factory program back in the old pcm before you remove the pcm. Install the new pcm and have tech. install the program that he took from the other car into your new pcm. He will then have to take both of your keys (not 1 key), but both and program them so the pcm will recognize them. He will then do a quick scan on your system for an "all clear", and you're done. If you have a custom tune for your mods, go ahead and install it in your new pcm and be on your way!

 

Section G

(Might be Omitted)

This picture shows a harness plug that is under your dash found just below your speedometer and tachometer. The male plug is just a dummy plug that connects the 2 red/light blue wires together. If you go ahead and put the 2 switches on the clutch pedal assy., you'll want to run the 2 wires that are red/lightblue  to the bottom switch on the pedal assy. (starter enabler switch) The other 2 wires go to the top switch on the pedal assy. One white wire and one black wire. (cruise control deactivater switch). 

Section H

Installation Photos 

 

  

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Calculating the Tooth count for the Driven Speedo Gear.

Posted On: July 30, 2005

Very often it becomes necessary to recalibrate the speedometer after changes are made to the rear axle ratio or rear tire size.  Sometimes this can be accomplished by simply changing the ddriven gear at the end of the speedo cable thatss inserted into the transmission.  Before this gear can be changed the correct tooth count must be confirmed based on the changes made. 

In order to determine the tooth count for the "driven" gear it is also necessary to know (or find out) the exact tooth count on the ddrive gear located on the output shaft of the transmission.  Some transmissions use drive gears that have 1 or 2 different tooth counts.  This can be found by removal of the transmissionss tail-housing, or simply finding out what the standard OEM tooth count is.  Once that information is available using the provided tooth-count calculator for the driven gear is an easy task.

Keep in mind, that very often only a limited number of driven gears are available for specific transmissions.  Sometimes it becomes necessary to use a gear with the closest available count.    

To access our Tooth-count Calculator use the link provided (Above).  

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Calculating the Tooth count for the Driven Speedo Gear.

Posted On: July 30, 2005

Cooler Return Line Chart

TRANSMISSION                                                 LOCATION

GM

…TTT………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...

ALUM. P.G……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….  TOP LINE

ST-300 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………  TOP LINE

THM 125 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………<  TOP LINE

THM 180…………<…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  REAR LINE

THM 200………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  BOTTOM LINE

THM 200-4R………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  BOTTOM LINE

THM 325………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

THM 325-4L………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

THM 350………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

THM 400………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

THM 425………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..OUTER LINE FARTHEST FROM THE CONVERTER

THM 440-T4………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

THM 700-R4………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  TOP LINE

FORD

A4LD………….………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...  TOP LINE

AOD………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….  BOTTOM LINE

ATX…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..  PUMP END

AXOD……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...  BOTTOM LINE

C3………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...  REAR LINE

C4/C5………….………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...  REAR LINE

C6………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………  REAR LINE

E4OD………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….  REAR LINE

FMX………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. REAR LINE

CHRYSLER

404………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………... TOP LINE

A-500………….……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. REAR LINE

A-604…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. FRONT LINE

KM170………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………OUTER LINE FARTHEST FROM THE DIFFERENTIAL

TF-6………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. REAR LINE

TF-8………….…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. REAR LINE

 

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Calculating Engine RPM at various driving speeds.

Posted On: July 30, 2005

Over the years many of our customers have asked us to calculate an engine's RPM at various driving speeds (MPH).  Sometimes they've changed a transmission, a rear axle ratio, or even tire size.  All of these things will effect what an engine's rpm will be at a given vehicle speed.  In order to make this information more readily available and convenient for our customers to find, we have developed an on-line RPM calculator that will accurately provide this information.  It's also set up so that you can easily input and make changes to any of these parameters and get immediate results.

To access our RPM Calculator use the link provided (Above).  

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High Stall Torque Converters

Posted On: April 30, 2004

High stall torque converters are very desirable in drag race vehicles because they allow the engine to develop maximum torque (say 5000 rpm), before the vehicle leaves the starting line.  This type of converter is designed to slip more, or have a higher stall speed then the typical 1300-1900 rpm factory converter.  Modifying an engine for increased power will raise the rpm it produces at this new usable horsepower.  When the engine power is increased, it will require matching the proper high-stall torque converter.  This is important, in order to allow the engine to reach its usable horsepower range before the converter reaches its stall speed, and hydraulically loads the engine.   Stall speed is the maximum rpm that an engine can obtain against the hydraulic load of the torque converter with the transmission shaft held stationary.

The best performance is obtained with a converter that has a stall speed slightly higher than the rpm of the engine when it starts to produce its strongest usable power.  Too low of a stall speed will result in a bog, and launches will be slow, since the engine will not be in it's usable power range.  Too high of a stall speed will result in the engine reaching its peak power range below the rpm.  Since the converter can efficiently transfer power, this could result in excessive slippage.

The stall speed is controlled by the converter, engine power, and the ability to hold the transmission input shaft stationary.  When engine power is increased, stall speed will go up.  Likewise, when engine power is decreased, stall speed will go down.  Stall speeds with this type of torque converter are generally rated as what's termed the "Flash Stall Speed" or shock. This is the approximate rpm that the engine will go to when the throttle is quickly moved from the idle position to the wide open throttle with the transmission engaged.

This "Flash Stall Speed" will vary depending upon engine power, rear end ratio, and car weight.  It is very important to match all of the engine components; cam, carburetor, torque converter, rear end gear ratio, etc, to work in the same rpm range for the best results.  When modifying the engine, do not over cam or over carburete the engine.  These are two of the most common mistakes.

Select a rear-end gear ratio that will allow the modified engine and the high stall torque converter to perform efficiently in the rpm range they were built for.  A general recommendation, would be to use gears in the following ranges:

3.10 to 3.50 for 2,400 to 2,800 rpm stall converter,

3.50 to 4.10 for 3,000 to 3,800 rpm stall converter,

4.10 and higher range with higher stall converters.

Keep in mind, for a given stall speed, the turbine shaft is held stationary with either the wheel brakes or the transmission brake until the driver is ready to take off.  The use of a trans-brake allows the driver to make maximum use of a given stall speed.  Stall speed will be limited in cars without a transmission brake.  This is because the gear reduction of the transmission and the rear end would provide enough mechanical advantage to overcome the car's wheel brake system.  When using the wheel brakes, often the best launch technique for a high stall converter is to leave from a fast idle.  This will allow the converter to momentarily flash to a higher stall speed (Flash Stall Speed).  This is better then bringing the engine rpm up against the converter and car brakes and also preloading the suspension.   When using this launch technique, the engine must idle clean and have a stumble free response to throttle movement.

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The Transmission Brake

Posted On: April 29, 2004

A transmission brake is usually considered a drag racing "only" automotive after-market device. It operates by simultaneously applying the forward and reverse clutch packs of an automatic transmission while its both in gear, and the torque converter is at or near it's stall speed. At the moment the trans-brake is disengaged the reverse element is released (usually the engine is revving at peak power) and the car will immediately lunge forward from its starting position.

You might wonder what the difference is between holding back a revving car in gear with just the wheel brakes versus that with a trans-brake. In order to understand this difference, more must be explained about the car's suspension, and how it operates during the initial take-off. 

If your car has a rear-axle drive with a solid suspension, it most likely also has what's called "anti-squat". This term defines the function of the rear suspension geometry that prevents the body of the car from "squatting" during it's initial acceleration. In fact, the rear of the car will rise if the anti-squat factor is high enough to overcome the inertial forces encountered during this initial acceleration. Many cars from Detroit incorporate an anti-squat design in order to prevent suspension "bottoming" during initial acceleration. You can find out if your car has this feature by performing a simple stall test and if the rear end rises, it has anti-squat. If your car has an independent rear suspension, such as the Corvette, it will squat because this type suspension has a "pro-squat" type geometry built into it.

How is the trans-brake and the rear suspension related? Keep in mind that for every force in one direction, there is an equal and opposite force in another. The force that is opposite to the raising of the rear will appear as high instant tire loading during initial acceleration. Its instantaneous because this force only occurs at a moment during the initial launch. This at the time between when the car is at rest and when full power is being transferred to the rear suspension.

Since the traction forces of the rear tires usually increase relative to their contact patch force, a car having more anti-squat will always have a higher acceleration and therefore will launch much quicker. If the wheel brakes are used for staging, the rear suspension becomes preloaded and all the anti-squat factor is already used up. When a trans-brake is used for staging, the rear suspension remains at rest and is unloaded. At the moment you flick the switch and release the trans-brake, the immediate transfer of engine torque "shocks" or loads the rear suspension, performing as it would with a stick-shift car. The trans-brake also prevents the high-powered/high stall car from overpowering its brakes on the line. By comparison, the trans-brake release action is much faster than lifting your foot off the brake pedal (or even a clutch pedal for that matter).

The trans-brake is used in conjunction with a specially calibrated full manual valve body. During operation the transmission will function normally, even if you choose not to use the trans-brake. A toggle switch is used to simply turn off its operation. Since the trans-brake is an added feature, the operation of the transmission can not be adversely affected when it is not being used.

The FB trans-brake is available for the following types of high performance transmissions:

GM - TH350 /TH400 / Powerglide

FORD - C-4 / C-6 / 4STB / AO3

MOPAR - TF727 

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Special Instructions for the 4STB-E Transmission

Posted On: February 29, 2004

4STB-E  Trans-Brake Overdrive Lock/Up (w/Foot-Brk Disable)

OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS AND WIRING

For use with Auto Reset Relay Controller #10

(White Plug Connector)

  

 Your high performance transmission is now equipped with the finest and safest full manual valvebody available today.  It comes standard with the electrically activated Overdrive and Lock-Up features.  It may also include our optional internal Trans-brake feature. The following information covers both the wiring and operation of all these features in order to make your use of the 4STB-E (AODE/4R70W) transmission both rewarding and enjoyable.

WIRING and Operation (9-pin)  Feb (2012)

Wiring connections are required to make all of the electrical features functional.  This connection is provided with a pig-tail with (5) colored wires.  Each wire must be connected properly as described:

1. Yellow wire (Lock-up) connected to the brown wire on Relay Controller. 

Used to activate and deactivate the converter Lock-up feature in Over-drive or 3rd Gear.

The Lock-up feature will automatically deactivate when either circumstance occurs:

a)    When the shifter lever is moved out of the 3rd gear position (toward Neutral or 2nd Gear).

b)    When the brake pedal is depressed.

Lock-up will automatically deactivate when the shifter lever is moved out of the 3rd gear position.

Note: If optional 3rd-gear lock-up is included, the Lock-up feature must be wired independently.

2. Orange w/Yellow Stripe wire (Over-drive) - connected to the orange wire on Relay Controller.  This is used to activate and deactivate the transmission's Over-drive feature.  This can only be activated when the transmission is in 3rd gear.  Overdrive will automatically deactivate when the shifter lever is moved out of the 3rd gear position.  Over-drive is strictly a cruising gear.

You cannot activate Over-drive under full throttle conditions.  Doing so will damage the transmission.

Note: If optional 3rd-gear lock-up is included, the Lock-up feature must be wired separately.

3. Pink wire (Lock-up) - connected to a reliable (fused) ignition 12 volt power source.  This will provide continuous power to the Lock-up function when the ignition is on.

4. Pink w/Black Stripe wire (Trans-brake) - connected to a reliable (fused) ignition 12 volt power source.  This will provide continuous power for the Tran-brake function when the ignition is on.  (An optional toggle switch can also be used to switch power and disable the Trans-brake solenoid entirely).

5. Purple wire (Trans-brake) - connected to "momentary" switch (similar to a Line-lock switch) that is also connected to a good ground source.  The momentary switch should be mounted in a convenient location in the cockpit (like the shifter or steering wheel) to activate the Trans-brake.

Note: Please check the actual wire colors on the pig-tail connector you received.  If they are different from those specified above use only the 9-Pin Connector diagram (Top of the page) to determine the wire and functional hook-ups.  The transmission functions and their locations on the connector will not change.

Optional: We have found that by hooking up the Trans-brake in conjunction with a roll-control system allows the car to be staged perfectly at any desired rpm.  If your car is not equiped with a roll system type a micro-switch will do a similar job just as well

SPECIAL NOTES: The transmission shift pattern is P-R-N-(E/OD)3-2-1 *Remember the Trans-brake must not be engaged while the vehicle is in motion!!

Do not hit the trans-brake while in 1st gear and the car is moving.

Once the transmission has been shifted into 3rd, the toggle switch (or whatever switch you're using), can be closed causing the transmission to shift into over-drive (4th).  It will stay in overdrive until the switch is opened.  It is highly recommended that you open the switch before you come to a stop.  If the switch is left closed (Overdrive On), the transmission will shift directly into overdrive when the shift lever is moved from 2nd to 3rd gear when up-shifting.  This is not recommended and transmission durability will be compromised.

OPERATION Trans-brake:

1. The transmission has a 3- speed Forward Shift Pattern.  The Trans-brake will apply only in low (1st) gear.   Reverse is engaged by shifting into reverse and then applying the Trans-brake button. This is a built-in safety feature.

2. Stage the car with the engine above 1000 RPM to obtain higher fluid pressure and volume which will provide a quicker trans-brake engagement.

3. Maximum engine rpm with the trans-brake applied, creates excessive heat very quickly.  (40 to 50 degrees/sec)  On a full tree, wait for the next to the last yellow bulb, before bringing the engine speed to the full stall rpm.  Always use an adequate trans fluid cooler (min. 25,000 GVW capacity) and inspect the condition of the trans fluid very often. 

4. For proper operation, the trans-brake solenoid should only be used with a fully charged 12 volt battery source in order for it to function properly.

5. If any operational problems occur with the trans-brake, check the activation button, all electrical connections, and the by-pass delay box if one is used. 

6. If you should encounter a delay or hesitation in the release of the trans-brake, check the following:

a. The fluid level in the transmission; a low level can cause a delay in trans-brake release.

b. A faulty release switch; check operation of the switch used to release the trans-brake.

7. Since the trans-brake only works in 1st gear, if you should accidentally hit the activating switch while in any other gear, the mechanism will not engage.  This is a built in safety feature.

8. The transmission will operate normally, even if you choose not to use the trans-brake.  Simply flip the toggle switch to the off position.  The trans-brake itself is an "added" feature for your transmission and cannot adversely affect the transmission's operation when it is not being used.

Reaction Time is influenced by the following:

1. Position the driver stages the car in relation to the racetrack timing lights.

2. The type of trans-brake button that is used, its location, and when the driver releases it.

3. Release speed of the trans-brake.

4. Weight of the racecar.

5. Horsepower of the engine and the rpm when it produces peak torque.

6. Stall speed and torque multiplication characteristics of the torque converter.

7. Gear ratio's of the transmission and rear axle.

8. Type of chassis and suspension, how it is set up and adjusted.

9. Diameter of the front tires.

10. Drag slick size, the sidewall construction, rubber compound, age or condition, inflation

      pressure, and the width of the rims they are mounted on.

11. Type and positioning of the race track timing lights (their height and distance apart).

NOTE:  Racecars that produce quick reactions times on a "pro" start tree, are generally setup to lift the front tires out of the timing lights.  This method works great on most cars, but will cause a consistency problem on some cars.  Consistent reaction times require positioning the race car the same distance into the staging light beam every time.

4STB-E  AUTO RESET

RELAY CONTROLLER- WIRING

OVERDRIVE and LOCK-UP

WIRE COLOR             FUNCTION

- BLUE.............Oil Pressure switch on side of trans. (either terminal doesntt matter)

- RED..............12v+ switched from ignition (fused)

- BLACK............Ground

- YELLOW.........to L/U button

- GRAY.............to L/U (YELLOW and GRAY are NOT polarity sensitive!!!)

- WHITE...........to O/D button

- GREEN...........to O/D button (WHITE and GREEN are NOT polarity sensitive)

- ORANGE.........to O/D solenoid wire from trans. (usually orange with yellow stripe wire coming out of 9 pin connector)

- BROWN..........to L/U solenoid wire from trans. (usually yellow wire coming out of 9 pin connector)

 NOTE: Transmission case must be properly grounded for this system to operate correctly.  O/D and L/U switches can be any 2 prong single throw momentary switch.  Regular on/off toggle switch will not work with this system.  These instructions are for Rostra wire harness only!

 

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